Sexual Health

We answer your question and offer screenings and quick results

PRIVATE SEXUAL HEALTH TESTING YOU CAN TRUST

At Eyano Medical we understand that STIs can be caused by viruses, fungus, parasites or bacteria. Anyone who is sexually active may be at risk of acquiring an STI. The risk is higher for those with increased numbers of sexual partners, or who have had sex with someone who has/had many partners, or have had unprotected sex. This is why we have a number of tests and screenings to help find out which virus, fungus, parasite or bacteria is causing your health issues. All test samples are sent to the Doctor's Lab

SEXUAL HEALTH APPOINTMENTS

SEXUAL HEALTH SERVICE WE CARRY OUT

FAST Chlamydia testing

These are tests that have a turnaround time of up to 4 hours

FAST Gonorrhoea Testing Simplex

These are tests that have a turnaround time of up to 4 hours

Chlamydia Testing

Chlamydia is the most common curable STI diagnosed in the UK. Often asymptomatic, anyone who is sexually active is considered to be at increased risk of chlamydia infection. It is the most commonly recognised, screened and treated of all STIs.

Gonorrhoea testing

Gonorrhoea is caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which multiplies easily in the mucous membranes of the male and female reproductive tract. It can cause serious and permanent health conditions if not treated. Symptoms of gonorrhoea are usually overt in men with white, yellow, or green discharge from the penis. Gonorrhoea can also infect the throat and rectum – individual PCR swabs from each site should be taken to screen for gonorrhoea. Resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and treatment is now combined with oral and injectable antibiotics. Partners should be treated at the same time with retesting after two weeks to confirm clearance – test of cure is recommended following treatment for gonococcal infections.

Hepatitis B testing

The hepatitis B virus is transmitted through blood and sexual fluids. This can most commonly occur in the following ways such as direct contact with infected blood, unprotected sex, use of illegal or “street” drugs, biohazard needles and other medical/dental equipments or procedures that are contaminated or not sterile. These tests help us Identify possible infections

Herpes profile

Genital herpes caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). The virus lives in the nerves and when active it travels to the surface of the infected area and makes copies of itself – called shedding, because new virus cells can at this time rub off onto another person. The virus travels back down the nerve to a ganglion usually at the base of the spine where it lies dormant for a while. It causes painful blisters on the genitalia and surrounding areas. It can be passed through intimate sexual contact and for this reason is referred to as an STI. Once infected, it remains a chronic long term condition with the virus remaining with recurrent activity with variable frequency.

There are two types of herpes simplex virus: Type I and Type 2. Both are highly contagious and can be passed easily from one person to another. There is no cure for genital herpes, the symptoms can usually be controlled by antiviral medication. Although using a condom can reduce the risk of herpes transmission, condoms are not 100% effective as herpes can be spread from skin-to-skin.

HIV testing and screening

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that attacks the body's immune system. If HIV is not treated, it can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). There is currently no effective cure. Once people get HIV, they have it for life. But with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled.These tests are used to identify the presence of HIV 1 or 2 and then determine the severity of the infection.

Human Herpes Virus testing

Genital herpes caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). The virus lives in the nerves and when active it travels to the surface of the infected area and makes copies of itself – called shedding, because new virus cells can at this time rub off onto another person. The virus travels back down the nerve to a ganglion usually at the base of the spine where it lies dormant for a while. It causes painful blisters on the genitalia and surrounding areas. It can be passed through intimate sexual contact and for this reason is referred to as an STI. Once infected, it remains a chronic long term condition with the virus remaining with recurrent activity with variable frequency.

STI full screening

This is a comprehensive examination that includes Bloods & swabs being taken and sent to the lab for analysis.

STI screening without HIV

This is a STI examination without testing for HIV virus.

Sex Hormone Binding Globulin

Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is a protein synthesized by the liver which binds tightly to the steroids testosterone, oestradiol and DHT and transports them in the blood in an inactive form. SHBG levels are indicated in the investigation of hirsutism in women and for infertility, reduced libido or erectile dysfunction in men, particularly when androgen levels are within normal ranges and this does not fit the clinical picture. Increased SHBG levels can be seen in anorexia, pregnancy, ageing, growth hormone deficiency, androgen deficiency, hyperthyroidism, liver disease, hyperprolactinaemia, active porphyria and also with oestrogens.

Decreased SHBG levels can be seen in obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hypothyroidism and growth hormone excess, as well as with glucocorticoids, androgens, progestins. It can also be familial. In the investigation of hyperandrogenism in adult women, SHBG is often assayed in conjunction with total testosterone. From these results the free androgen index (FAI) can then be calculated to give an estimate of bioavailable testosterone. This calculation is not appropriate in males.

Syphilis testing and screening

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum. The signs and symptoms of syphilis vary depending on which of the four stages it presents (primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary). We can identify the presence of a syphilis infection using several methods including PCR, NAAT & IgM/IgG testing.

SEXUAL HEALTH FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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If you are male and don’t have any symptoms you will need to provide a urine sample, which we will test for chlamydia and gonorrhoea. Men will also do a blood test for HIV and syphilis, and occasionally hepatitis B or C.

If you are female and don’t have any symptoms you will be given a swab to test for chlamydia and gonorrhoea. You can do the swab yourself. The swab involves inserting a small cotton bud into the entrance of the vagina and rotating the swab a few times against the walls of your vagina. Women will also do a blood test for HIV and syphilis, and occasionally hepatitis B or C.

What are some symptoms of sexually transmitted infections in women?

Common STI symptoms in women include:

•        change in vaginal discharge (fluid)

•        redness or itching

•        pain

•        pain during sex

•        heavier periods

•        spotting

•        needing to urinate frequently

•        discomfort when urinating

•        ulcers or sores

•        lumps on the skin

If you’ve been having anal sex, you may notice a change in bowel habit such as pain, constipation or diarrhoea, blood or mucus in your stools.

If you have any of these symptoms, come see us as soon as possible.

Common STI symptoms in women include:

• change in vaginal discharge (fluid)

• redness or itching

• pain

• pain during sex

• heavier periods

• spotting

• needing to urinate frequently

• discomfort when urinating

• ulcers or sores

• lumps on the skin

If you’ve been having anal sex, you may notice a change in bowel habit such as pain, constipation or diarrhoea, blood or mucus in your stools.

If you have any of these symptoms, come see us as soon as possible.

Common STI symptoms in men include:

•        discharge (fluid) coming from the tip of the penis

•        redness or itching

•        pain in the testicles

•        discomfort when urinating

•        needing to urinate frequently

•        ulcers or sores

•        lumps on the skin

If you’ve been having anal sex, you may notice a change in bowel habit such as pain, constipation or diarrhoea, blood or mucus in your stools. If you have any of these symptoms, come see us as soon as possible.

Have safe sex. Safer sex means having sex with less risk of transmission (catching or passing on) an STI. The risk of catching each infection is different and varies according to the type of sex you are having (eg oral, vaginal or anal sex). For example. herpes is often passed on through oral sex, but HIV is rarely passed on this way. Anal sex carries the highest risk of passing on infections such as HIV and hepatitis, followed by vaginal and then oral sex. Non-penetrative sex (such as body rubbing and mutual masturbation) carries the lowest risk, but some infections (such as warts and herpes) can be passed on in this way. Come in and speak to a health adviser for more information.

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Oral sex can include fellatio (sucking a penis), cunnilingus (licking female genitals) or oro-anal contact (anal licking or "rimming"). Herpes, warts, gonorrhoea, chlamydia, syphilis, HIV, hepatitis B and other infections can be transmitted through oral sex. The risk of catching an STI through unprotected oral sex is lower than for unprotected vaginal or anal sex, but is not zero. For most infections (except herpes), the risk of catching an infection is greater for the one giving oral sex than for the one receiving.

Reduce the number of partners with whom you have oral sex and avoid brushing teeth or flossing before having oral sex. Avoid oral sex with ejaculation to reduce the risk of HIV and other infections. Insertive fellatio (being sucked) is lower risk than receptive fellatio (sucking a penis). If you have oral cuts or sores, or a sore throat, avoid oral sex or use condoms.

No form of sexual contact is entirely without risk of STI transmission. Non penetrative contact (body rubbing or mutual masturbation without penetration) carries the lowest risk. Herpes can be transmitted through kissing and it may be possible to transmit other STIs (including syphilis and hepatitis B) in this way, although the risk is lower than for penetrative sex. If you are fingering, using sex toys or fisting your partner, the risk of transmission is related to the degree of trauma – how much damage is done to the delicate lining of the vagina or anus. If you think there is a risk of trauma, use latex or non-latex gloves for penetrative sex.

If you are living with HIV, staff at your clinic will be able to give you detailed advice on safer sex. Taking effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) and having an undetectable plasma/blood HIV viral load significantly reduces the risk of HIV transmission during sex. Poor adherence (missing doses of ART) may increase the risk of HIV transmission. Continuing to use condoms for vaginal, anal and oral sex will further reduce any remaining risk of transmission. If you are living with HIV or you have partners who are or may be HIV positive, have an STI check regularly depending on your sexual activity, and at least once a year if you're sexually active.

MENTAL HEALTH INFO BLOGS

Eyano Medical Services

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 1pm
Tuesday: 9am  - 6pm
Wednesday: 9am - 8pm
Thursday: 2pm - 6pm
Saturday: 10am - 2pm
Friday & Sunday: Closed
Closed for lunch  Tuesday 1 - 2 pm and Wednesday 1 - 3pm

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